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Eating away over the winter


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Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 19 July, 2020 13:31
One of the best Adelaide has to be the juvenile Sky's efforts to hype things up with the Dockside Derby. Portsmouth v Plymouth. I wouldn't like to walk it. I guess Southampton v Newcastle could be so described.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 19/07/2020 13:32 by Seaxe_man1.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 19 July, 2020 13:55
Just having a look at Portraits of Western 4-6-0s Adelaide. One of the classes being the County Class. Number 1000 was the County of Middlesex and a fine locomotive it was. Unfortunately none made it to preservation. One however is under construction Glamorgan. Were I in the dough like Shad Khan I would have the County of Middlesex constructed at Southall and used for mainline heritage runs outa Paddington Happy Days. Believe I copped it in train number collecting days.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
adelaide 19 July, 2020 14:34
Quote:
Seaxe_man1
One of the best Adelaide has to be the juvenile Sky's efforts to hype things up with the Dockside Derby. Portsmouth v Plymouth. I wouldn't like to walk it. I guess Southampton v Newcastle could be so described.

I quite liked Mr Lineker's "so that's all square in the Borussia derby" - I don't think he was being serious.

I wonder if there is an Abu Dhabi derby?


Adelaide

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 20 July, 2020 07:06
If as you say Adelaide, Lewis is a Remainer, then he was (as were many) an unwitting part of the scam of the century.

Apart from the Funeral Director and the unelected Dodgy Lawyer, I don't think anyone was bothered about no deal.

Most were happy to declare the first innings at 0 for 0 to set up a fourth innings chase.

This we once did successfully in the Mike Brearley era versus Surrey.

Such that, Monty Lynch I think, picked up a pair before lunch. afore Mike Smith knocked the 139 for victory.

In the FA Cup semi finals, it was Middlesex 2 Lancashire 0. I am still hoping that FFC can make that a treble come Wednesday.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
adelaide 20 July, 2020 11:17
No, no, no! Lewis was not a Remainer, he was an extreme Brexiteer!

At the time he and his mates were told that their intransigence was putting any kind of Brexit at risk. However, the way things have turned out they might well get what they wanted, a no deal Brexit. I doubt that is what most people wanted, or want now but as the distinction was not on the referendum ballot paper we will never know.


Adelaide

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 20 July, 2020 17:39
Ok Adelaide. I misread your post. Makes him an ok guy for me. No deal better than a bad deal. May's certainly was. For me any deal which makes us statuswise a Brussels OKW colony not for me. Scam of the century which costs plenty with little in return except hassle.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 20 July, 2020 17:52
Middlesex. Gaily into Ruislip Gardens, Runs the red electric train, With a thousand Ta's and Pardon's, Daintily alights Elaine; Hurries down the concrete station, With a frown of concentration, Out into the outskirts edges, Where a few surviving hedges, Keep alive our lost Elysium - rural Middlesex again. - Sir John Betjeman.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 22/07/2020 19:04 by Seaxe_man1.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
adelaide 21 July, 2020 16:43
SM

Not sure when the poem was written but it was already an elegy for something almost entirely gone - rural Middlesex - rather than for suburban sprawl Middlesex as it was by the 1950s.

My father used to tell me how he used to go cycling from Hammersmith in the direction of what is now Western Avenue and it was country from somewhere like East Acton onwards. Maybe that was the last bit to be developed.

As an aside, London's development has usually been linked heavily to transport. The rail companies which built so many lines in the 1800s often invested in land that could be used for housing. The Metropolitan Line was perhaps the most extreme example, hence the Metroland that fascinated Betjeman. Including Private Eye's beloved Neasden, which they lampooned almost as often as Betjeman's style!

On my side of the county, Parliament insisted that workmens' fares were available on the Liverpool Street lines to Cheshunt and Chingford. There was no such insistence for the Enfield Chase line. Maybe that is why the character of Eastern Enfield is so different to further west. Or maybe the west, being hillier, had already attracted more prosperous inhabitants; there were certainly lots of country houses built in the area when it was still rural. (Some of them paid for through profits from slavery, I expect, but that is another story.)

Re: Happy Middlesex day
freddie tittlemouse 21 July, 2020 18:18
When I was growing up in Teddington/Hampton in the 50s we had a local plumber and an odd job man both in their 50s who were Middlesex born and bred and who both had distinct rustic accents, presumably a genuine Middlesex accent. I should imagine that died out many years since. No straw chewing yokels in smocks to be found lurking in Ruislip or Uxbridge these days.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 22 July, 2020 17:59
Two good posts chaps. Over here. In the 1930s Rayner's Lane was a muddy lane and the platform was wooden. The Railway era of the 1840s drove the industrial revolution and the economy. It follows that the Beeching badly thought out cuts caused the reverse. Some of which are being reviewed about fifty years too late. I agree Adelaide, the railways were looking ahead with land acquisitions.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 22 July, 2020 17:59
Two good posts chaps. Over here. In the 1930s Rayner's Lane was a muddy lane and the platform was wooden. The Railway era of the 1840s drove the industrial revolution and the economy. It follows that the Beeching badly thought out cuts caused the reverse. Some of which are being reviewed about fifty years too late. I agree Adelaide, the railways were looking ahead with land acquisitions.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
adelaide 22 July, 2020 18:16
Quote:
Seaxe_man1
The Railway era of the 1840s drove the industrial revolution and the economy. It follows that the Beeching badly thought out cuts caused the reverse. Some of which are being reviewed about fifty years too late.

I don't think that follows automatically. Canals helped drive the first industrial revolution but their demise was caused by the railways which then drove the second - you could locate your factory anywhere where a railway had been built, not just along a waterway. The demise of the branch lines was caused by the move to the car and lorry - you could locate your factory almost anywhere. We now see the environmental impact of that but it is hard to see any downside for the economy at that time.

I suspect that it was freight that kept some of the branch lines going as long as they did. I came across some info on some of the obscure branch lines in Hertfordshire (Hatfield to Luton, Harpenden to Hemel Hempstead, Hertford to Welwyn) and they had just a handful of passenger journeys each day. Some of them stayed open for a time for freight after passenger services stopped. Once freight moved to the roads, it would have been very difficult to keep them going, I think.

In the Middlesex context, there was a branch from Seven Sisters to Palace Gates. I can remember dodging the pigeon "gifts" under the bridge at Noel Park station in Wood Green High Road. The Enfield Town line originally ran through Edmonton to join the main line at Angel Road. The line through Seven Sisters came later. Belmont to Harrow rings a bell, also branch lines at West Drayton. The most famous is the Alexandra Palace-Finsbury Park branch, at one time intended to become part of the tube but now just a popular walk.


Anorakaide

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 22 July, 2020 19:02
Harrow to Belmont. Originally Stanmore
Always known as the Stanmore Rattler. A load of opposition to closure well used. Would not get away with that today with car congestion, pollution etc. Now a walkway.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 22/07/2020 19:11 by Seaxe_man1.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 22 July, 2020 19:16
HS2 a big issue in Hillingdon. West Ruislip Station area chaotic. Loads of tunnelling. The West Drayton branch went to Staines and the Paddington Express a costly replacement for LHR. M3 covers part of that branch.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 23 July, 2020 08:32
In trainspotting days Mill Hill was a favourite. Beyer Garratts hauling 300 ten ton trucks full of coal. Underneath was a single track which went to Edgware coalyard, now the bus station and garage. A freight train, tank engine plus half a dozen freight wagons were the users. This rail formation could have been used to connect Mill Hill East with Edgware my home town. Would have made sense and done away with trips via Camden Town to gain access to that branch of the Northern Line.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
BarmierKev 23 July, 2020 09:23
Quote:
Seaxe_man1
In trainspotting days Mill Hill was a favourite. Beyer Garratts hauling 300 ten ton trucks full of coal. Underneath was a single track which went to Edgware coalyard, now the bus station and garage. A freight train, tank engine plus half a dozen freight wagons were the users. This rail formation could have been used to connect Mill Hill East with Edgware my home town. Would have made sense and done away with trips via Camden Town to gain access to that branch of the Northern Line.

Interestingly, 2 days ago I walked through disused railway track ( some of which no longer exists) from Edgware to Mill Hill East. This took me through Copthall.

I also had a go at the Edgware Stanmore branch but due blocked areas I end up on Edgwarebury farm and off course.

Apologies if i have gone off topic.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
adelaide 23 July, 2020 11:10
I think the extension to Edgware was supposed to go to Bushey Heath. I've read somewhere that it was dropped because Green Belt legislation would have prevented the housing being built that would have provided the income to justify it being built. Another indication, really, of how transport and development go hand in hand. Also of just how huge the London conurbation (and probabvly Greater London itself) would have got without the Green Belt regulations. I also think the line though Mill Hill East to Edgware did carry passengers at one stage but well before my time, I suspect.

Curiously enough, I had a walk last year through Edgewarebury Farm, coming out at one end of Elstree. The the south side of the M1 you had the farm with some amazingly well groomed horses. On the other side there was a very posh, probably old but done up. house with the most amazing views back towards London. As the M1 is in a cutting there it probably did not detract much from the setting. I think I was still in (historic) Middlesex - just!

I do like my little walks in the country (like Borehamwood to Radlett CC). I find the bits where suburbia suddenly becomes countryside (thanks to the Green Belt) are particularly fascinating. You can almost sense where the cement mixers were switched off. Less likely to do any this year as the bus is necessary to avoid making the walk circular.


Adelaide

Re: Happy Middlesex day
BeefyRoberts 23 July, 2020 21:29
I think there were plans for Northern Line to be extended up towards Aldenham.
There was a London Transport Bus overhaul works there until, I think, the early 1990's (might of been earlier).
At the time of Northern line extension thoughts, that at Aldenham was to be an Underground stock overhaul works.
Once the idea was scrapped, it was turned into the bus works, as was built to accommodate Underground stock, hence the height of building at the time, to take overhead cranes to move the cars about.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
Seaxe_man1 23 July, 2020 21:44
The HS2 is scheduled to reopen some of the Beeching closures. It is to use 11 miles of the Great Central trackbed at Brackley. This had a massive rail works, so on closure by the genius Beeching, it became a Wild West ghost town. Another was Woodford Halse. It is to use another closed Beeching Station. Curzon Street in Birmingham. An expensive replacement for the GCR which did Nottingham, Sheffield, Manchester and Liverpool. Ridiculous decision. Typical sixties and seventies intelligence or lack of.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 24/07/2020 09:24 by Seaxe_man1.

Re: Happy Middlesex day
freddie tittlemouse 24 July, 2020 17:45
The closure of the GCR which could have relieved some of the pressure on lines from Euston was one of the most inexplicable of the 60s railways decisions along with the closure of the Varsity line from Oxford to Cambridge (now being rebuilt) and the closure of the line from Tunbridge Wells to Crawley via East Grinstead which could have transported some of the thousands who drive into Gatwick every day.
Nobody could really object to the removal of 4 trains a day branch lines to places like Old Cobblers and Piddling in the Marsh but the ones above were pure short term cost cutting.

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